09 Feb

Celebrating Women in Tech Through the Years

In recent years, it’s been noted that we need more women in the technology field. The truth is, women have been involved in technology for decades. Unfortunately their stories haven’t made it to the forefront of our history lessons. To encourage more women to join the ranks of these pioneers, it is vital that we recognize those who have forged ahead and made advances in the tech industry. We need female role models in order to inspire young women to dive into technology at an early age.

Below is a brief history and timeline of women over the years who have shaped and impacted the tech industry. From designers to mathematicians, these women changed the world we live in with their innovative spirits and groundbreaking inventions.

Ada Lovelace – 1800’s
Recognized as the world’s first computer programmer, Ada Lovelace worked with Charles Babbage’s “Analytical Engine” design by translating lecture notes from French to English. During her work, Ada discovered many errors and realized the machine could be used for more than calculation. In 1843, she created the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine – thus creating the first concept of a computer operating system.

 

 

Edith Clarke – 1920’s
Known as a human computer, Edith Clarke was the first woman to earn her master’s degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She invented the Clarke calculator which computed electrical systems equations 10 times faster than existing methods and worked on the construction of the Hoover Dam. In 2015, Clarke was posthumously inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame.

 

 

Grace Hopper – 1940-50’s
Admiral Grace Hopper was a huge believer in change and fought the phrase, “We’ve always done it this way,” her whole career. Prior to language-based computer programming, computers used binary code. Enter Grace, who took on programming in English which sparked the development of the common business-oriented language (COBOL) that is still widely used today.

 

 

Katherine Johnson – 1950-60’s
Ever since she could remember, Katherine Johnson loved math. It was this love that eventually lead her to NASA where she worked on crucial missions including the Apollo 11 flight to the moon. At NASA, Katherine calculated the trajectories, launch windows, and emergency back-up return paths for numerous missions. In 2015, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and recently NASA renamed a facility after Katherine to honor her efforts.

 

 

Susan Kare – 1980-90’s
Graphic designer Susan Kare is responsible for developing some of Apple’s signature graphics. Although the graphics look simple, they are incredibly difficult to design. Think about it – she created a way to communicate different technologies via pictures, making them crystal clear to each user. These innovations are still used as icons to this day. Susan was honored for her efforts with an AIGA Medal, a prestigious award in the design world.

 

 

Megan Smith – 2010’s
First female Chief Technical Officer of the White House, Megan Smith is a huge advocate for women in STEM fields. Before working at the White House during the Obama Administration, she served as Vice President of Business Development at Google and CEO of PlanetOut, a leading LGBT online community. Megan is currently the CEO and founder of shift7, an organization that works in partnership on systemic economic, social, and environmental challenges.

 


WRITTEN BY
Cindy Madden
Contributor at 11P, Wordsmither, Lover of Foods Wrapped in Dough, Proud Cat Lady.

 

 

 

Ada Lovelace. Digital image. Scientific American. 10 October 2017, https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/image.
Edith Clarke. Digital image. Wikipedia. 27 January 2019, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Clarke.
Grace Hopper. Digital image. Vassar College. 06 July 2017, https://stories.vassar.edu/image.
Katherine Johnson. Digital image. NASA. 24 November 2015, https://www.nasa.gov/image.
Susan Kare. Digital image. PLOS. 22 November 2011, https://blogs.plos.org/neurotribes/image.
Megan Smith. Digital image. NPR. 04 November 2014, https://www.npr.org/image.

05 May

Star Wars Takeover: And the Winner Is…

And we’ve got a winner!!!

But first, just in case you missed the STAR WARS TAKEOVER on our social feeds, head on over to our Instagram or Facebook account. It’s okay, we’ll wait…

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Did you hear the one about the Star Wars text crawl walking into a bar?

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The bartender yells, “Get outta my pub! We don’t serve your type here.” (Reader’s Digest)

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Just a little designer humor for you…

Okay, so today, we’re announcing the most popular Star Wars character illustration. There were six total and it was a close battle…

So, are you ready?

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The winner is… BB8!!!!

 

Now let’s see how that magic happened…

 

We also wanted to share a little behind the scenes footage of our talented designers work.

Music: Williams, J. (1999). Dual of the Fates [Recorded by Abbey Road Studio]. On Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace Soundtrack [CD].

 

Another year, another Star Wars Day gone. We hoped you enjoyed the takeover!!!

May The Fourth Be With You.

 

20 Jan

5 Podcasts that Inspire Creativity

Anyone else feeling the winter blues?

Here on the east coast it is oddly not frigid, which somehow makes winter even harder to get through. We keep looking over our shoulders for the “real winter” to get here. Regardless, even with the 50-something degree temperatures, right now it feels impossible to get the creative juices flowing, especially early in the morning, when the sun isn’t even out yet. Where are you sun?

As much of an over-exaggeration as that was, sometimes it’s just plain hard to sustain creativity. We all have our slumps. When we, at Eleven Peppers, hit one of those speed bumps we find it extremely handy to look toward the creative community for inspiration. One way we do this is by tuning in to our favorite podcasts; so here is a starter set that we believe will burst open the figurative imagination-dams and let the brilliant ideas flow.

99% Invisible: Episode 128 – IKEA Hacking
Because who doesn’t love a good IKEA hack? This episode dives into the worldwide phenomenon with guest, Jules Yap (pseudonym), creator of the popular website. The site allows innovators around the world to contribute to an extensive library of “hacks”, share their how-to guides, and trade tips with each other. Although we rarely hack apart and put back together furniture for our clients (okay, never), the ingenuity packed into this podcast is awe-inspiring.

After the Jump: Episode 62 – Sources of Inspiration
Literally a “jumping-off” point for figuring out where to look for inspiration and more importantly, how to harness it once you’ve found it. The show’s host Grace Bonney discusses her personal sources of inspiration. We find that hearing about how others’ stay creative only fuels our own creativity.

How I Built This: Episode 1 – Spanx
If you love TED Radio Hour (see next podcast suggestion) you may love this even more! Each episode features the founder(s) of popular brands and companies. In particular, their first episode with guest Sara Blakely (founder of Spanx) is an inspirational, sweet, yet self-deprecatingly funny depiction of how the mega-brand started from the meekest beginnings. It reminds us that no matter how small our idea is today, we have the power to make it grow.

TED Radio Hour
And of course TED Radio Hour. Each episode combines TED Talks that converge upon a central theme.

The Power of Design: Design is all around us. This episode touches on how design is and can be used to influence personal experiences, thoughts, feelings, and much more. Just remember to use that power for good.

How Things Spread: The various speakers in this episode provide unique views on how things, like laughter or viruses, spread and how those same concepts can be applied to other endeavors. It will really open your mind.

Of course there are plenty more, but we hope that this little “booster pack” will evoke creativity, inspire innovation and remind you that “winter is coming”… just kidding, winter will come to an end, as will any slump you find yourself in.